Category: Infrastructure Security

TLS/SSL Vulnerabilities

“Which SSL ciphers should I disable?”

A client recently gave me a list of their supported ciphers and asked me which SSL ciphers they should disable – effectively looking for the most secure SSL ciphers they can use. Instead of the fast answer of “disable the insecure ones”, I thought I’d try and write up something useful.

So here’s a handy reference guide I’m working on. This has been time consuming to develop and no doubt will be added to over time. This isn’t intended to be read from start-to-finish, but is more of a handy SSL/TLS issue cheat-sheet.

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A long old way to Domain Admin: Propagating Infections

On a recent penetration test I made heavy use of Sec-1 Ltd’s tool sharecheck in a way to gain Domain Administrator privileges that had previously been missed. Effectively there was a lot of ground work in horizontal propagation which I automated through Meterpreter and Sharecheck.

I’ve mentioned Sharecheck before on my Internal Penetration Testing post, but I don’t believe I’ve ever ran through the features of this tool which I make use of on almost every test. Effectively this tool allows you to do four main things:

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Linux PrivEsc: Abusing SUID

Recently during a CTF I found a few users were unfamiliar with abusing setuid on executable on Linux systems for the purposes of privilege escalation. If an executable file on Linux has the “suid” bit set when a user executes a file it will execute with the owners permission level and not the executors permission level. Meaning if you find a file with this bit set, which is owned by a user with a higher privilege level than yourself you may be able to steal their permissions set.

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Cracking Windows Domain Passwords for Password Analysis

There’s no doubt that domain accounts with weak passwords can be a serious concern for companies, there are a few ways you can protect yourself against issues like this. The first is to set a domain and local account lockout policy and the second is to enforce password complexity. However if your users are using “Password1” as their password, neither of these steps will protect you.

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Hacking a Corporation From the Inside: Internal Penetration Tests

This is one part of a two part series, maybe take a look at Hacking a Corporation From the Outside: External Penetration Tests too!

Introduction

Occasionally I get asked by clients how I approach the technical aspects of a Penetration Test, you know, what are all those little black boxes with green text that I’ve got open on my screen? Also occasionally, when I’m talking to new testers and people interested in becoming a penetration tester, they understand tool use and they often understand the specifics of vulnerabilities but don’t necessarily know how it all goes together.

Additionally, GracefulSecurity.com is filled with information on Infrastructure security, but there’s no guide about how it all fits together!  So I plan here, to write up a step-by-step example of how I go from plugging in to a corporate network and end up leaving that day as a Domain Administrator.

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