Category: OWASP Top 10

TLS/SSL Vulnerabilities

“Which SSL ciphers should I disable?”

A client recently gave me a list of their supported ciphers and asked me which SSL ciphers they should disable – effectively looking for the most secure SSL ciphers they can use. Instead of the fast answer of “disable the insecure ones”, I thought I’d try and write up something useful.

So here’s a handy reference guide I’m working on. This has been time consuming to develop and no doubt will be added to over time. This isn’t intended to be read from start-to-finish, but is more of a handy SSL/TLS issue cheat-sheet.

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Hacking Web Applications:

Getting Root Access to Web Servers

I’ve written previously about How To Become a Penetration Tester, listing things that employers would like to see out of potential junior testers. I’ve written an awful lot about many web application vulnerabilities like Cross-site Scripting and Directory Traversal; I’ve even written about the methodology behind External Penetration Testing. However – until now I’ve not tied all of the little pieces together. Plus, one of the biggest things on the list of desirables for a junior testers CV is practise.

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SQL Injection Filter Evasion with sqlmap

Whenever I find a SQL injection vulnerability I always throw sqlmap at the injection point. It’s a simple, easy to use tools that will not only prove the vulnerability but allow you to extract data, gain command execution, and generally push further on with your penetration test. If I come across a filter or a web application firewall then I’ll habitually break out Burp Suite and start working on filter evasion manually, however there’s often a simpler way.

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Notes: On CSRF vs JSON

Today I found a possible Cross-site Request Forgery vulnerability in a web application, however – the application expected JSON as its input. The fact that the input is JSON means that the attack is a little bit more complicated, the browsers built in protections get in the way a little more. So here’s some notes and tricks which might help a little!

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SQL Injection: Exploitation

Structured Query Language (SQL) is used all over the web and is potentially vulnerable to an injection attack any time that user input is insecurely concatenated into a query. An injection attack allows an attacker to alter the logic of the query and the attack can lead to confidential data theft, website defacement, malware propagation and host or network compromise.

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