Category: Web Application Security

SQL Injection: Out-of-Band Exploitation

This is an advanced SQL Injection (SQLi) post, if you’re new to SQLi maybe try this one first: Basics and Defence

 

Recently I had a fairly slow Time-Based SQL injection vulnerability, meaning that I could only pull a single character at a time with SQLmap and each character took around 10 seconds to retrieve. An alternative approach in this situation is to use out-of-band retrieval.  This is a concept that can be used when exploiting lots of vulnerabilities such as SQL Injection, Command Injection, Cross-site Scripting and XML External Entity Injection.

The idea is fairly simple, instead of capturing the data you would like to retrieve and extracting it through Boolean-logic you can request the system to transmit the data over a protocol such as HTTP, SMB or DNS.

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Hacking Web Applications:

Getting Root Access to Web Servers

I’ve written previously about How To Become a Penetration Tester, listing things that employers would like to see out of potential junior testers. I’ve written an awful lot about many web application vulnerabilities like Cross-site Scripting and Directory Traversal; I’ve even written about the methodology behind External Penetration Testing. However – until now I’ve not tied all of the little pieces together. Plus, one of the biggest things on the list of desirables for a junior testers CV is practise.

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Hacking a Corporation From the Outside: External Penetration Tests

This is one part of a two part series, maybe take a look at Hacking a Corporation From the Inside: Internal Penetration Tests too!

Introduction

Occasionally I get asked by clients how I approach the technical aspects of a Penetration Test, you know, what are all those little black boxes with green text that I’ve got open on my screen? Also occasionally, when I’m talking to new testers and people interested in becoming a penetration tester, they understand tool use and they often understand the specifics of vulnerabilities but don’t necessarily know how it all goes together.

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Introduction to Content Security Policy

Content Security Policy (CSP) is a built-in protection mechanism in web browsers that allows you to specify trusted sources for content such as JavaScript and allows you to block inline incudes. It can effectively stop attacks such as Cross-site Scripting and ClickJacking.

The settings are configured server side and given to the web browser via a server response header, the “Content-Security-Policy” header, here’s a simple example of one of these headers:

Content-Security-Policy: script-src 'self'; object-src 'self'

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SQL Injection Filter Evasion with sqlmap

Whenever I find a SQL injection vulnerability I always throw sqlmap at the injection point. It’s a simple, easy to use tools that will not only prove the vulnerability but allow you to extract data, gain command execution, and generally push further on with your penetration test. If I come across a filter or a web application firewall then I’ll habitually break out Burp Suite and start working on filter evasion manually, however there’s often a simpler way.

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