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SQL Injection: Out-of-Band Exploitation

This is an advanced SQL Injection (SQLi) post, if you’re new to SQLi maybe try this one first: Basics and Defence

 

Recently I had a fairly slow Time-Based SQL injection vulnerability, meaning that I could only pull a single character at a time with SQLmap and each character took around 10 seconds to retrieve. An alternative approach in this situation is to use out-of-band retrieval.  This is a concept that can be used when exploiting lots of vulnerabilities such as SQL Injection, Command Injection, Cross-site Scripting and XML External Entity Injection.

The idea is fairly simple, instead of capturing the data you would like to retrieve and extracting it through Boolean-logic you can request the system to transmit the data over a protocol such as HTTP, SMB or DNS.

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Linux PrivEsc: Abusing SUID

Recently during a CTF I found a few users were unfamiliar with abusing setuid on executable on Linux systems for the purposes of privilege escalation. If an executable file on Linux has the “suid” bit set when a user executes a file it will execute with the owners permission level and not the executors permission level. Meaning if you find a file with this bit set, which is owned by a user with a higher privilege level than yourself you may be able to steal their permissions set.

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Hacking Web Applications:

Getting Root Access to Web Servers

I’ve written previously about How To Become a Penetration Tester, listing things that employers would like to see out of potential junior testers. I’ve written an awful lot about many web application vulnerabilities like Cross-site Scripting and Directory Traversal; I’ve even written about the methodology behind External Penetration Testing. However – until now I’ve not tied all of the little pieces together. Plus, one of the biggest things on the list of desirables for a junior testers CV is practise.

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